In the spring of 2020, Gov. Jay Inslee directed all Washington State public schools to close to help our state and nation combat the spread of the coronavirus COVID-19.

The safety of our students and staff is our priority. We will provide updates and resources in an effort to help families reduce the risk in their homes and community.

  • Need meals? If you need extra food assistance, let us know by contacting Family Resource Center.
  • Need emergency childcare? Currently, we are offering free childcare to medical professionals and first responders. Send Community Education Director Mary Weishaar an email to sign up.
  • Need internet? Comcast is offering free internet for families in need.
  • Want to help? Information about donations is posted here.

 

FAQs: About Coronavirus COVID-19

What is COVID-19?

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a virus strain that has only spread in people since December 2019. Health experts are concerned because little is known about this new virus and it has the potential to cause severe illness and pneumonia in some people.

Guidelines from Public Health.

How does the virus spread?

You generally need to be in close contact with someone with COVID-19 to get infected. Close contact includes scenarios like living with or caring for a person with confirmed COVID-19, being within six feet of a person with confirmed COVID-19 for 15 minutes, or if someone with COVID-19 coughed on you, kissed you, shared utensils with you or you had direct contact with their body secretions.

Guidelines from Public Health.

Do any Camas students or staff members have COVID-19

We are tracking known positive cases, quarantines, and isolations for on-campus staff and students on our COVID-19 Dashboard.

Do you have resources I can use to talk about the coronavirus with my child?

As adults, it’s important we remain calm with our actions and words and share factual information. Sharing accurate information during a time of heightened concern is critical. One of the ways we can protect our community from illness is to keep rumors and misinformation from spreading.

Here are some resources you may use to talk about the coronavirus with students:

Where can I find more information about the coronavirus?

This is an evolving situation. Stay up to date by consulting the following webpages:

 

What is COVID-19?

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a virus strain that has only spread in people since December 2019. Health experts are concerned because little is known about this new virus and it has the potential to cause severe illness and pneumonia in some people.

Guidelines from Public Health.

What can I do to prevent coronavirus?

Students and staff can reduce their risk of getting and spreading viral respiratory infections, including the flu and the common cold, by taking simple steps which will also prevent coronavirus, these include:

  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a sleeve or a tissue.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, or use alcohol hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
Who should seek medical evaluation for coronavirus?

Public Health has specific advice for people who have been confirmed with COVID-19, have been around someone with COVID-19, or are feeling unwell but haven’t been in close contact with someone with COVID-19. Read Public Health guidance.

When should I keep my child home from school?

Deciding when a child is too sick to go to school can be a difficult decision to make. When trying to decide, use these guidelines to help make the best decision.

  • Fever: Keep a child home if they have a temperature of 100 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. Remember a child must be fever-free for 72 hours (without the aid of Tylenol/Ibuprofen or other fever reducers) before returning to school.
  • Sore throat: Be mindful of sore throats, especially those with a fever or swollen glands in the neck. If your child has strep throat, they can return to school after 72 hours of appropriate treatment.
  • Diarrhea: Three or more loose stools in a 24-hour period.
  • Vomiting: Keep a child home if they’ve thrown up two or more times in a 24-hour period.
  • Rash: Watch for rashes, especially those that cause fever, itching or swelling.
  • Chronic cough and/or green nose discharge: These conditions may be contagious and require treatment. Please visit your healthcare provider.
  • Ear: Any ear pain with a fever should be evaluated by a physician. Untreated ear infections can cause permanent hearing loss.
  • Eye Redness: Eyes that have matted or crust on the eyelids after sleep, mucus or pus drainage, redness, and pain should be evaluated by a healthcare professional for possible “pink eye” or conjunctivitis.
  • Lice or Scabies: Your child is able to return to school after treatment.
  • Chickenpox: Children with Chickenpox must remain home for five days after the beginning of blisters, or until all pox are scabbed over and dry.
How does Camas SD clean and disinfect?

Hard surfaces and frequently touched areas such as stair rails and door knobs are wiped down with a disinfectant solution multiple times a day. Cafeteria surfaces are disinfected before and after each lunch. Buses are wiped down between routes.

In addition, here is a list of areas our school custodians clean daily:

  • All door knobs
  • All stair handrails
  • All elevator doors/buttons
  • All light switches
  • All drinking fountains
  • All crash bars on doors
  • All sink faucets
  • All urinal/toilet handles
  • All dispensers

Resources

Centers for Disease Control

Washington State Department of Health

Clark County Public Health

 Fact Sheets from the Centers for Disease Control in English, Spanish, Russian